Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

 

Diamonds Are Forever Movie Poster- James bond standing on a metal claw with two women perched beside him, Cartoon diamond behind. Diamonds Are Forever written in yellow

Diamonds Are Forever © movieposterDB

Director: Guy Hamilton

Writers: Ian Fleming (Novel), Richard Maibaum and Tom Mankiewicz (Screenplay)

Starring: Sean Connery, Jill St. John, Charles Gray, Lana Wood

Production Company: Eon Productions, Danjaq

Kent Locations Used: The Port of Dover

Diamonds Are Forever was directed by Guy Hamilton and features the legendary Sean Connery as James Bond for the very last time. The seventh spy film in the popular series sees Bond impersonating a diamond smuggler to uncover a plot to destroy a city. Will he be able to keep one step ahead of his nemesis and save the day?

Based on Ian Fleming’s novel of the same name, this thrilling film is about Bond’s battle with his old nemesis, Ernst Stavro Blofeld, after discovering he isn’t just a diamond smuggler but is using the diamonds to build a giant laser to destroy Washington DC.

Starring alongside Sean Connery is Jill St. John (The Lost World, Tony Rome) as Tiffany Casethe, Charles Gray (The Devil Rides, You Only Live Twice) as Ernst Stavro Blofeld and Lana Wood (Captain America) as Plenty O’Toole.

The Port of Dover was used for the scene where Bond swaps identities with Diamond smuggler Peter Franks (Joe Robinson) and makes his escape to France.  The Port of Dover has also been used for filming by Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows (2011), Albert’s Memorial (2010) and Missing (2009).

Diamonds Are Forever can be purchased on DVD.

 

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 


Doctor Who – Inferno (1970)

Jon Pertwee as Dr Who in a suit in an office with a brick wall

Jon Pertwee as Dr Who © BBC

Director: Douglas Camfield

Starring: Jon Pertwee, Caroline John, Nicholas Courtney, Olaf Pooley, Christopher Benjamin

Production Company: BBC

Kent locations used: Kingsnorth Industrial Estate, Medway

Inferno is a seven part story of popular sci-fi show, Doctor Who, starring Jon Pertwee. Inferno, is a science project aimed at exploiting a new power source underneath the earth’s crust. While the Doctor is fixing his TARDIS, he is thrown in to a parallel universe, where his misgivings of Inferno are confirmed when he sees how it has almost completely destroyed the alternate earth.

Kingsnorth Powerstation next to a road

Kingsnorth Powerstation screenshot © BBC

Jon Pertwee (Worzel Gummidge, Jackanory) stars as the third Doctor alongside Caroline John (Harry Enfield’s Television Programme, P.R.O.B.E), Nicholas Courtney (The Sarah Jane Adventures, Downtime), Olaf Pooley (The Master, Star Trek: Voyager) and Christopher Benjamin (Pride and Prejudice, Angel).

The production visited Kingsnorth Industrial Estate in Medway which featured as the setting for the Inferno project. This estate used to be a large oil refinery known as Berry Wiggins and Co Ltd. and is now an Industrial Estate to many businesses.

Medway is a group of towns set along the River Medway, steeped in history, particularly with Charles Dickens connections. Productions which have previously filmed in the area include London Spy (2015), Les Misérables (2013) and Sherlock Holmes (2009).

Doctor Who – Inferno was shown in 1970 and is now available to purchase on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 

 


Doctor Who – The Mutants (1972)

Jon Pertwee inside Chilslehurst Cave talking to a man with a torch

Jon Pertwee as Doctor Who at Chislehurst Caves © BBC

Director: Christopher Barry

Starring: Jon Pertwee, Katy Manning, Paul Whitsun-Jones, James Mellor and Garrick Hagon

Production Company: BBC

Kent locations used: Bluewater Quarry, Chislehurst Caves, Stone House Farm Caves.

The Mutants is a six part story of popular sci-fi show, Doctor Who, starring Jon Pertwee. The Doctor and his companion, Jo, arrive at Skybase One during the 30th century when the planet, Solos is fighting for independence from the Earth’s empire. However, the natives have started to mutate in to hideous looking creatures and the doctor needs to find out why.

Jon Pertwee (Worzel Gummidge, Jackanory) stars as the third Doctor alongside Katy Manning (Gloria’s House, Evil Never Dies), Paul Whitsun-Jones (The Quatermass Experiment, Huntingtower), James Mellor (Marat/Sade, The Oblong Box) and Garrick Hagon (Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory).

The production visited Bluewater Quarry which was the setting for the planet Solos prior to the shopping centre being built. The quarry began in the early 19th century and was then rapidly enlarged for cement production in the 1950’s; however it then closed down in the 1980’s and is now  Bluewater shopping centre.

Chislehurst Caves also feature and doubled as the interior Solos’ caves. Chislehurst Caves are man-made and 22 miles long, initially dug as chalk and flint mines and are believed to have been last worked in during the 1830’s. The first mention of the mines was in 1250, during World War II when the caves became an air raid shelter for 15000 people with electrical lighting, a chapel and a hospital. The caves are now a tourist attraction and have been used for TV series Merlin (2008) and Vinnie Jones film The Riddle (2007).

The production also visited Stone House Farm Caves which represented the cave system entrance on Solos. It is situated near Strood in a field next to Lower Rochester Road. The caves are thought to be old chalk mines. The Medway area has previously been seen on screen in Jekyll and Hyde (2015), Great Expectations (2012) and Canterbury Tales (2003).

Doctor Who: The Mutants was first shown in 1972 and is now available to buy on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 


Doctor Who – Mind of Evil (1971)

Doctor Who (Jon Pertwee) in a suit sat in front of a tiled wall

Doctor Who (Jon Pertwee) © BBC

Director: Timothy Combe

Starring: Jon Pertwee, Nicholas Courtney, Katy Manning, Richard Franklin, Roger Delgado, Pik Sen Lim

Production Company: BBC

Kent locations used: The junction of Archer’s Court Road with Pineham Road in Whitfield, Dover Castle, the hangar at Former RAF Swingate, the former Manston Airport, now Stone Hill Park

The Mind of Evil is a six part story of popular sci-fi show, Doctor Who, starring Jon Pertwee. The Doctor and his companion, Jo, arrive at Stangmoor Prison for the demonstration of a machine that has been created by Professor Keller to pacify criminals. However, when the Doctor discovers that his enemy, the Master, is involved he does everything to stop him before it is too late.

Jon Pertwee (Worzel Gummidge, Jackanory) stars as the third Doctor alongside Katy Manning (Gloria’s House, Evil Never Dies), Roger Delgado (First Man Into Space, The Road to Hong Kong), Nicholas Courtney (The Sarah Jane Adventures, Downtime), Richard Franklin (Emmerdale, Twilight of the Gods) and Pik Sen Lim (Emergency-Ward 10, Mind Your Language).

The production filmed in Kent where they visited Dover Castle which doubled as the exterior of Stangmoor Prison the junction of Archer’s Court Road with Pineham Road in Whitfield which was the location where the Master’s troops ambush the missile convoy. The hangar at Former RAF Swingate was used as the Master’s hiding place for his deadly missile and Stone Hill Parkformerly Manston Airport which was the base for the helicopter company providing the choppers and aerial footage in the series.

Dover Castle was founded in the 11th century and defended the coast of Britain for almost 500 years. It is now run by English Heritage as a tourist attraction and is a very popular filming location having welcomed productions such as The Apprentice (2015), Wolf Hall (2015) and To Kill a King (2003).

Dover is a coastal town, home to the infamous White Cliffs of Dover, Dover Castle and Europe’s busiest passenger port, the Port of Dover. The Dover area has welcomed filming from productions such as Mr Selfridge Series 3 (2015), Great British Railway Journeys (2014) and Missing (2009).

Stone Hill Park is the site of the former Manston Airport and is currently awaiting development boasting a runway and wareshouse space. It has been used for James Bond’s Die Another Day (2002).

Doctor Who: The Mind of Evil was first shown in 1971 and is now available to buy on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 


Battle of Britain (1969)

Battle of Britain movie poster- montage of characters from the film in square boxes, Battle of Britain written in red on top with a sun set scene of a town skyline above

Battle of Britain © United Artists

Director:  Guy Hamilton

Writers:  James Kennaway, Wilfred Greatorex, Derek Dempster, Derek Wood.

Starring:  Michael Caine, Trevor Howard , Harry Andrews, Christopher Plummer

Production Company: Spitfire Productions

Kent Locations Used: Denton, The Jackdaw Inn (Denton), Chilham, RAF Hawkinge

Set in 1940, the film tells the tale of the epic battle of Britain. Nazi Germany is attacking the airfields of the south east as part of Operation Sea Lion, and in order to stop the enemy from achieving their goals for invasion, the British Royal Air force must fight a desperate battle for control of the skies.

With death defying aerial acrobatics, this historical re-enactment takes the audience to the heart of World War II. With the Luftwaffe advancing onto London, the RAF must gather their destroyed resources and launch a critical attack.

Starring Michael Caine (The Dark Knight, The Italian Job), this feature was not to be his last visit to the county: the actor returned in Is Anybody There? , the touching story of the friendship between a young boy and a retired magician, which was filmed in Folkestone and Hythe.

The Battle of Britain featured some of the best of Kent’s locations. The village of Chilham was mentioned on fictional signs at the control centre at the end of the film. A popular filming location in the county, Chilham is most famous for appearing in Agatha Christie adaptations.  Miss Marple: The Moving Finger was filmed almost entirely in the village and it was also home for a special Christmas episode of Poirot.

Another Kent Village, Denton, appeared in the film. The local pub, The Jackdaw Inn, had a cameo as the scene for Christopher Plummer (The Sound of Music) and his on-screen wife, giving the audience an insight into the personal effects of war. The Jackdaw Inn has a room devoted to RAF World War II memorabilia and is a must see for any history buff.

RAF Hawkinge was the obvious choice as a location for the film. With a rich military history, the site is now a museum with the largest collection of Battle of Britain artefacts on show in the country.

The Battle of Britain was released in 1969 and is now available to buy on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 


Anne of The Thousand Days (1969)

Anne standing by the fountain at Penshurst Place, Penshurst place can be seen in the background

Anne by the fountain at Penshurst Place © Universal Pictures

Oscar winning epic film depicting the rise and fall of Anne Boleyn, second wife to Henry VIII.

Director: Charles Jarrott

Writers:  Maxwell Anderson (Play), Bridget Boland (Screenplay writer), John Hale (Screenplay writer), Richard Sokolove (adaptation)

Starring: Richard Burton, Geneviève Bujold, Anthony Quayle, John Colicos, Irene Papas

Production Company: Hal Wallis Productions

Kent Filming Locations:  Hever CastlePenshurst Place

Geneviève Bujold as Anne walking down steps on a garden path, her hand is raised

Geneviève Bujold as Anne © Universal Pictures

Based on the Broadway play by Maxwell Anderson, Anne of the Thousand Days is an account of the rise and fall of the beautiful and ambitious Anne Boleyn (Genevieve Bujold), second wife of the tyrannical Henry VIII (Richard Burton).

The film was nominated for 10 Oscars in 1970, including best picture and won best costume design.  It also won Golden Globes for Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Actress and Best Director.

Hever Castle was an obvious choice for Anne Boleyn’s home, as it was her real-life home. It was used for the scenes where King Henry VIII (Richard Burton) visits the Boleyn household to pursue Anne Boleyn (Genevieve Bujold).

The stunning Kentish scenery of both Hever Castle and Penshurst Place bought this Oscar winning tale to life with Hever Castle being an obvious choice to double as Anne Boleyn’s home, as it was her real-life home and was used for the scenes where King Henry VIII (Richard Burton) visits the Boleyn household to pursue Anne Boleyn (Genevieve Bujold). Hever Castle is now a visitor attraction and includes many 16th century Tudor portraits, furniture and tapestries. The castle also displays two prayer books, signed and inscribed by Anne Boleyn.  The castle has been used for other film projects such as Inkheart, (2008) The Other Boleyn Girl (2008) and Lady Jane (1987).

Exteriors of Penshurst Place were used to double as the King’s court and the stunning formal Tudor gardens were used for the scenes where King Henry VIII (Richard Burton) is shooting targets when Anne Boleyn (Genevieve Bujold) joins him as well as  where she announces her pregnancy. The Gardens, arranged into “garden rooms” each with a different style and character are also open to visitors between March and November. Penshurst Place has been seen on screen in projects such as The Hollow Crown – Henry V (2012) and  Merlin (2008).

Anne of The Thousand Days also features in the Kent Film Office Tudor(ish) Trail which celebrates Kent’s Tudor history and film connections.

Anne of the Thousand Days was released in 1969 and is now available to buy on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 


Doctor Who – The Dominators (1968)

Patrick Troughton at Doctor Who standing in the tardis facing a man who has his back to the camera

Patrick Troughton at Doctor Who © BBC

Director: Morris Barry

Starring: Patrick Troughton, Giles Block, Wendy Padbury, Frazer Hines and Arthur Cox

Production Company: BBC

Kent locations used: Wrotham Quarry

The Dominators is a five part story of popular sci-fi show, Doctor Who, starring Patrick Troughton. The Doctor and his companions, Jamie and Zoe, land on the planet of Dulkis to find the Dominators and the Quarks, their robotic servants, enslaving the peaceful Dulcians. Can the trio help the natives and prevent the Dominators from destroying the planet?

Patrick Troughton (The Omen, Hamlet) stars as the second Doctor alongside Giles Block (Me and Orson Welles, Armchair Theatre), Wendy Padbury (Freewheelers, Crossroads), Frazer Hines (Huntingtower, Emmerdale) and Arthur Cox (Aria, Hope and Glory).

The production visited Wrotham Quarry which doubled as the surface of Dulkis.

Screenshot at Wrotham Quarry screenshot - a man standing with the Quarks behind him

Screenshot at Wrotham Quarry screenshot © BBC

Wrotham Quarry is located in the Addington and was formally known as Olley Sand Pit, used for producing sand for the glass industry. The Quarry is still active today and part of Hanson Aggregates.

The Tonbridge and Malling area has been chosen as a film location by productions including Great British Railway Journeys (2014), Missing Series Two (2010) and Cape Wrath (2007).

Doctor Who: The Dominators was first shown in 1968 and is now available to buy on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 


Doctor Who – The Enemy of the World (1968)

Mary Peach as Astrid Ferrier is standing on a beach. Behind her is a retro-looking helicopter. She is wearing an all-leather flying suit. The photo is in black-and-white.

Mary Peach as Astrid Ferrier in Doctor Who – The Enemy of the World (1968) © BBC

Director: Barry Letts
Writer: David Whitaker
Starring: Patrick Troughton, Frazer Hines, Deborah Watling, Bill Kerr, Mary Peach
Production Company: BBC
Kent Locations Used: Dungeness Power Station

The Enemy of the World (1968) is a serial of the fifth season of the original 1967 Doctor Who series. Set in 2018, the story follows the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton) and his companions as they become embroiled in a case of mistaken identity. When the Doctor discovers his uncanny resemblance to Earth’s scheming dictator Salamander (also played by Troughton), he must use this likeness to bring him down.

For over 40 years, only Episode 3 of the serial was known to exist. However, on 11th October 2013, the BBC announced that the remaining five episodes had been recovered from a TV station storage room in Nigeria.

Not all original Doctor Who serials have been rediscovered. The 1968 episodes entitled “Fury from the Deep” are still missing – unfortunate, as these allegedly feature Botany Bay, Kingsgate Bay and the Redsand Towers Sea Forts!

Written by David Whitaker (Doctor Who, Showtime) and directed by Barry Letts (Eastenders, David Copperfield), The Enemy of the World stars Patrick Troughton (The Omen, Jason and the Argonauts) as the Second Doctor, Frazer Hines (Emmerdale) as his companion Jamie, Deborah Watling (The Invisible Man, The Newcomers) as his other companion Victoria, Bill Kerr (Gallipoli, The Pirate Movie) as Giles Kent and Mary Peach (Room at the Top, Couples) as Astrid Ferrier.

Dungeness Power Station briefly appears in Episode 4 of the serial, doubling as the exterior of Salamander’s research station.

The now defunct power stations were originally built in 1965 and 1983 respectively. The building borders the Dungeness Estate, a unique expanse of SSSI shingle beach with ramshackle huts, old and ultra-modern residences, two light houses, a cafe by the historic railway station, boat moorings, a lifeboat station, two pubs and artist galleries. Other productions to have filmed in Dungeness include Back to Life (2019-2021), Brave New World (2020) and another Doctor Who episode – The Claws of Axos (1971).

The Enemy of the World originally aired on BBC1 between Saturday 23rd December 1967 and Saturday 27th January 1968. It is now available to watch on Amazon or purchase on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map.


The Beverly Hillbillies (1967)

The Beverly Hillbillies poster- 4 cast members smiling at the camera in front of a doorway. The Beverly Hillbillies  written on a wooden sign above

The Beverly Hillbillies poster © Filmways Television/McCadden Productions

Director: Joseph Depew

Creator: Paul Henning

Starring: Buddy Ebsen, Irene Ryan, Donna Douglas, Max Baer Jr., Raymond Bailey, Nancy Kulp

Production Company: Filmways Television, McCadden Productions

Kent Locations: Penshurst Place 

The Beverly Hillbillies is an American comedy about a poor hillbilly family who strike it rich after they find oil on their land. They move to Beverly Hills where they shake things up by bringing an unsophisticated and minimalistic lifestyle to the swank, sometimes self-obsessed and superficial community.

The Beverly Hillbillies was created by Paul Henning (The Bob Cummings Show, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Lover Come Back) and accumulated seven Emmy nominations during its nine series run.

Joseph Depew (Petticoat Junction, Hennesey, Captain Kidd) directed 145 episodes, including those filmed in Kent which stars Buddy Ebsen (Barnaby Jones, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Northwest Passage), Irene Ryan (My Dear Secretary, The Diary of a Chambermaid, The Woman on the Beach), Donna Douglas (Frankie and Johnny, Lover Come Back, Career), Max Baer Jr. (Murder, She Wrote, Maverick, The Circle Family), Raymond Bailey (Vertigo, The Incredible Shrinking Man, Picnic) and Nancy Kulp (The AristoCats, Shane, The Parent Trap).

Penshurst Place entrance with driveway and trees. A car is parked in front

The Beverly Hillbillies screenshot at Penshurst Place © Filmways Television/McCadden Productions

 Penshurst Place with the writing Clampett Castle, kent, England on top

The Beverly Hillbillies screenshot at Penshurst Place © Filmways Television/McCadden Productions

The production chose to film at Penshurst Place which doubles as Clampett Castle which Jed (Buddy Ebsen) inherits, in series 6 episodes 3 and 4 and series 7 episodes 2-5.

Set in gorgeous parkland in West Kent, Penshurst Place is a Medieval and Tudor fortified style manor house boasting formal Elizabethan gardens, state rooms and Gardens, adventure playground and maze. A popular film location, Penshurst Place has previously featured in productions such as Wolf Hall (2015), The Great Fire (2014) and The Other Boleyn Girl (2008).

The Beverly Hillbillies aired between 1962 – 1971 and is available to purchase on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map. 


Half A Sixpence (1967)

a car driving along a road outside the Pantiles, people are walking along the side of the road

Screenshot from Half a Sixpence at The Pantiles © Paramount Pictures

Director: George Sidney

Stars: Tommy Steele, Julia Foster, Cyril Ritchard

Production Company: Ameran Films

Kent Locations Used: The Pantiles in Royal Tunbridge Wells, Aylesford

Based on the novel, Kipps: The Story of a Simple Soul by H.G. Wells, Half a Sixpence is a musical based on the themes of wealth and class. The film follows a draper’s assistant, Arthur Kipps (Tommy Steele), who falls in love with a chambermaid named Ann (Julia Foster). When Kipps inherits a fortune, he is torn between two worlds.

Golden Globe winning director George Sidney (Bye Bye Birdie, Viva Las Vegas, Annie Get Your Gun) directs the film which stars Tommy Steele (The Flintstones, Finian’s Rainbow, Quincy’s Quest) , Julia Foster (Dad’s Army, Alfie, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner) and Cyril Ritchard (The Hobbit, Peter Pan, Blackmail).

The Pantiles in Royal Tunbridge Wells is the set for Shalfords Emporium in the film, where Kipps apprenticed and the town of Aylesford was the setting of Kipps’ childhood home.

Situated in West Kent, Tunbridge Wells is a large town with a busy town centre and a period shopping area, The Pantiles,  offering a fascinating variety of small specialist shops, antique shops, open-air cafés, restaurants and bars. Previous productions that have been filmed in Tunbridge Wells include Terry and Mason’s Great Food Trip (2015).

A shot of Aylesford Bridge, with the river and village in the background

Screenshot from Half a Sixpence of Aylesford Bridge © Paramount Pictures

Aylesford is a picturesque village located on the banks of the River Medway complete with a Norman Church and Victorian houses, pubs and open spaces.

The film was released on 21 December 1967 and is available to purchase on DVD.

For more information about Kent’s Filming History please visit our Movie Map.